The Waltham Book of Human–Animal Interaction. Benefits and by I. Robinson

By I. Robinson

Divided into elements, this article brings jointly historic and present literature detailing the advantages linked to puppy possession, and examines interactions with animals and the way vendors can emphasize the positives linked to possession and reduce any power negatives. Chapters specialise in either the mental and social advantages linked to human-animal interactions. Line drawings and pictures illustrate the textual content

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The Waltham Book of Human–Animal Interaction. Benefits and Responsibilities of Pet Ownership

Divided into elements, this article brings jointly old and present literature detailing the advantages linked to puppy possession, and examines interactions with animals and the way proprietors can emphasize the positives linked to possession and reduce any power negatives. Chapters concentrate on either the mental and social merits linked to human-animal interactions.

Extra resources for The Waltham Book of Human–Animal Interaction. Benefits and Responsibilities of Pet Ownership

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1989) C o m p a n i o n animals, attitudes toward pets and health outcomes a m o n g the elderly: a longterm follow-up. Anthrozoos, 3, 25-34. 40. , Barker, D . J. P. and Cooper, C. (1988) Physical activity a n d calcium intake in fracture of the proximal femur in H o n g Kong. British Medical Journal, 297, 1441-1443. 41. Lawton, M . , Moss, M . a n d Moles, E. (1984) Pet ownership: A research note. Gerontologist, 24, 208-210. 42. Lemke, S. and Moos, R. H. (1989) Personal and environmental determinants of activity involvement among elderly residents of congregate facilities.

The sample was small and precluded addressing questions about what types of pets might prove to be most beneficial. The potential of pet ownership to promote health was documented, but the direct mechanism of this benefit was not determined. A recent large scale epidemiological study has provided evidence that pet ownership may protect people from developing coronary heart disease or slow its progression. It addressed the differences between pet owners and non-owners on physiological variables associated with increased risk of developing coronary heart disease, confronting some of the same issues evaluated in the study of survival by patients with coronary heart disease.

M . (1991) Presence of h u m a n friends and pet dogs as m o d e r a t o r s of a u t o n o m i c responses to stress in women. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 61, 582-589. 4. Barker, S. B. and Barker, R. T. (1988) The h u m a n - c a n i n e bond: Closer than family ties? Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 10, 46-56. 5. Berman, P. L. (1989) The Courage to Grow Old. Ballantine Books, New York. 6. Beyersdorfer, P. S. a n d Birkenhauer, D . M . (1990) T h e therapeutic use of pets on an Alzheimer's unit.

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