Fishing the Great Lakes: An Environmental History, by Margaret Beattie Bogue

By Margaret Beattie Bogue

Fishing the good Lakes is a sweeping background of the destruction of the once-abundant fisheries of the nice "inland seas" that lie among the us and Canada. although lake trout, whitefish, freshwater herring, and sturgeon have been nonetheless teeming as overdue as 1850, Margaret Bogue records right here how overfishing, pollutants, political squabbling, terrible public rules, and advertisement exploitation mixed to wreck the fish populations even ahead of the voracious sea lamprey invaded the lakes and decimated the lake trout inhabitants within the 1940s.Bogue focuses particularly at the interval from 1783, while nice Britain and the us first politically severed the geographic cohesion of the good Lakes, via 1933, whilst the economic fishing had handed from its heyday within the overdue 19th century into very critical decline. She exhibits how fishermen, entrepreneurial fish buyers, the monopolistic A. sales space and corporate (which dispensed and advertised a lot of the nice Lakes catch), and coverage makers in any respect degrees of presidency performed their components within the debacle. So, too, did underfunded scientists and early conservationists not able to spark the curiosity of an detached public. trouble with the standard of lake habitat and the abundance of fish more and more took a backseat at the back of the pursuits of agriculture, lumbering, mining, trade, production, and concrete improvement within the nice Lakes sector. delivering greater than a nearby background, Bogue additionally areas the issues of significant Lakes fishing within the context of prior and present all over the world fishery issues.

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Extra resources for Fishing the Great Lakes: An Environmental History, 1783-1933

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1 What manner of fish population was this: the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) or a close relative? How extensive was its population? What were the lake salmon's physical characteristics, life-cycle patterns, and habitat needs? Relying on the writings of those who knew the salmon of Lake Ontario, from the Jesuits of the seventeenth century to the settlerdevelopers of the nineteenth, a reasonably accurate image can be created. For want of an actual count of Lake Ontario's salmon population, consider the clues left by a number of early-nineteenth-century travelers and residents.

11 For Chicago's immigrant working class, the bounteous fish market in the city required no lures. The same attraction held for low-income people in the fishing ports and urban centers all around the lakes, especially noticeable in those where industry and commerce employed sizable work forces: Milwaukee, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, Sandusky, Erie, Buffalo, Rochester, Toronto, and Hamilton. In Cleveland, the retail market for fish clearly reflected class lines. In his survey of the Great Lakes fisheries, written in 1879, Frederick W.

Relying on the writings of those who knew the salmon of Lake Ontario, from the Jesuits of the seventeenth century to the settlerdevelopers of the nineteenth, a reasonably accurate image can be created. For want of an actual count of Lake Ontario's salmon population, consider the clues left by a number of early-nineteenth-century travelers and residents. They recounted that, on both the northern and southern shores of Lake Ontario, spawners swarmed up rivers and creeks in such numbers that settlers could catch them without fishing gear.

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